Web standards

Updates

After a great success of the Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP), Google is decided to give away of control how code is behaving in the background. AMP format which Google developed in a open source manner with the contribution of Google employees and all of the community, enables the high speed access of the online content on mobile phones. Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) is widely used now, across the thousands of websites.

According to Ace Ratcliff at the Huffington Post, Disabled People (Might) Finally Get Emojis That Represent Us, changing a scenario that currently has only one of 2,666 emojis representing persons with disabilities. Apple recently unveiled a proposal to the Unicode Consortium, suggesting 13 new emoji developed in consultation with community organisations like the American Council of the Blind, the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, and the National Association of the Deaf.

                                                                                       13 new emoji proposed by Apple

                                                                                         13 new emoji proposed by Apple
                                                                                          Isabella Carapella/HuffPost/Apple

The author notes that the lack of emojis is just one way in which persons with disabilities are underrepresented in society, stating that 'Apple’s 13 proposed emojis may be what society needs to recognise that disability representation is sorely needed and long overdue'.

The World Wide Web Consortium's Platform Working Group invites for the implementations of HTML 5.2 Candidate Recommendation.This specification defines the 5th major version, second minor revision of the core language of the World Wide Web: the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). It also calls for stronger implementation of the Encrypted Media Extensions recommendations made by W3C earlier in March 2017. These standards also might have implications for accessibility, particularly for persons with disabilities [link]

A concern has been raised about the rights of persons with disabilities to adequately use media content in the scope of a recent W3C working group proposal on strengthening the use of the Encrypted Media Extension. It has been noted that media content on the Internet must take into account the needs of persons with disabilities, for example, in adding alternate text titles for images, or strobe light warnings, and ensuring that screen readers work with web pages. This may become difficult, or illegal, with the new set of standards. EFF's appeal of the W3C director's decision on Encrypted Media Extensions and other news articles offer more information and positions on this situation.

Chrome, Firefox and Opera, some among the most popular Internet browsers, appear to be vulnerable to a specific sort of phishing attack, cybersecurity-related websites reported. The vulnerability allows perpetrators to conduct a so-called homograph type of phishing attack, in which a domain name that looks exactly like a legitimate one (such as apple.com, google.com or a domain of a bank for instance) is displayed in users' browsers, yet it is actually a different domain and leads to a fraudulent website. This fraud is possible in browsers which mishandle specific way of encoding (known as "punycode") used to display domains which contain non-Latin script letters (such as Cyrillic, Arabic or Chinese) in order to enable internationalized domain names (IDN) to be used. IDN domains used to trick the users in such way are also legitimate domain names (but used for fraudulent purposes), and can therefore obtain a legitimate SSL certificate, which adds a "https://" security layer which can additionally confuse users to believe the address displayed is the requested one. Technology websites are raising awareness about this issue and suggesting the ways to mitigate the problem in Firefox, while Chrome has released the updated version of its browser. Security professionals, however, fear that the vulnerability may be heavily exploited for cyber-attacks before users around the world upgrade their software.

New International Telecommunication Union’s standard provides basis for high-quality Voice over LTE (Long-Term Evolution). A new ITU standard highlights the key factors influencing end-to-end Quality of Service (QoS) for voice communications over 4G mobile networks. The standard will form the basis of future ITU standards on specific aspects of QoS for Voice over LTE (VoLTE) and Video-telephony over LTE (ViLTE).

The “End-to-end QoS for voice over 4G mobile networks” was developed by ITU’s standardization expert group for ‘performance, QoS and QoE’, ITU-T Study Group 12. ITU-T Study Group 12 develops international standards on performance, quality of service (QoS) and quality of experience (QoE). The group meets from 10th to 19th January 2017 in Geneva.

 

Web standards are a set of formal standards and technical specifications for the world wide web. They ensure that content is accessible across devices and configurations, and therefore provide the core rules for developing websites.

The main content and applications standards include: HyperText Markup Language (HTML), a plain text language which makes use of tags to define the structure of the document; eXtensible Markup Language (XML), another type of language used for sharing structured information; Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) a language used in conjunction with HTML to control the presentation of web pages; and eXtensible HTML (XHTML), an extended version of HTML which uses stricter rules.

 

Web standards in context

By the late 1980s, the battle of network standards was over. TCP/IP gradually became the main network protocol, marginalising other standards. While the Internet facilitated normal communication between a variety of networks via TCP/IP (see Technical Standards), the system still lacked common applications standards.

A solution was developed by Tim Berners-Lee and his colleagues at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) in Geneva, consisting of a new standard for sharing information over the Internet, called HTML. Content displayed on the Internet first had to be organised according to HTML standards. HTML, as the basis of the World Wide Web, paved the way for the Internet’s exponential growth.

Since its first version, HTML has been constantly upgraded with new features. The growing relevance of the Internet has put the question of the standardisation of HTML into focus. This was particularly relevant during the Browser Wars between Netscape and Microsoft, when each company tried to strengthen its market position by influencing HTML standards. While basic HTML only handled text and photos, newer Internet applications required more sophisticated technologies for managing databases, video, and animation. Such a variety of applications required considerable standardisation efforts in order to ensure that Internet content could be properly viewed by the majority of Internet browsers.

Application standardisation entered a new phase with the emergence of XML, which provided greater flexibility in the setting of standards for Internet content. New sets of XML standards were also been introduced, such as the standard for the distribution of wireless content called Wireless Markup Language (WML).

Setting web standards

The main web standard-setting institution is the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), headed by Tim Berners-Lee. Standards are developed through an elaborate process which aims to promote consensus, fairness, public accountability, and quality. At the end of the process, standards are published in the form of Recommendations.

When it comes to an open approach to standards development, W3C – in addition to other bodies such as the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the Internet Architecture Board (IAB), and the Internet Society – subscribes to the Open Stand initiative, an affirmation of principles that encourages the development of open and global market-driven standards.

W3C standards define an open platform for the development of applications, which enables developers to build rich interactive experiences. W3C states that ‘although the boundaries of the platform continue to evolve, industry leaders speak nearly in unison about how HTML5 will be the cornerstone for this platform.’

It is interesting to note that in spite of its high relevance to the Internet, so far, the W3C has not attracted much attention in the debate on Internet governance.

Other institutions involved in standards include the European Computer Manufacturers Association (ECMA), an association of companies whose main role is to develop Standards and Technical Reports.

Possible gaps in dealing with web standards

As with technical standards, the possible gap in the development of web standards is related to the coverage of non-technical aspects (e.g. human rights, competition policy, and security). Web standards have an even stronger impact on these non-technical aspects since, more so than technical standards, they shape the ways in which the Internet is accessed and used.

Events

Resources

Publications

Internet Governance Acronym Glossary (2015)
An Introduction to Internet Governance (2014)

Papers

A Security Analysis of Emerging Web Standards. HTML5 and Friends, from Specification to Implementation (2012)
Wireless Application Protocol WAP 2.0 Technical White Paper (2002)
A Protocol for Packet Network Intercommunication (1974)

GIP event reports

Universal Acceptance – Is the Internet Reaching the People it Needs to? (2018)

Processes

Click on the ( + ) sign to expand each day.
 

The GIP Digital Watch observatory is provided by

in partnership with

and members of the GIP Steering Committee



 

GIP Digital Watch is operated by

Scroll to Top