Child safety online

Updates

In a report, Barnardo, a UK based Children’s charity has raised concerns of the growing trend of internet addiction among children aged five and below owing to their early access to electronic devices. With children substituting more and more family time to be on social media is not only affecting their mental health but also resulting in  failure to think creatively, interact with others socially and manage their own emotions.

Chief Executive  Bernardo, Javed Khan shared “Although the internet offers incredible opportunities to learn and play, it also carries serious new risks from cyberbullying to online grooming….These risks can have a devastating impact on the lives of the UK’s most vulnerable children.”

During an Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA), where evidence from various online companies such as Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, and Google on the initiatives taken by them to combat child abuse online was heard, Facebook has been accused of leaving 'broken children as collateral damage' for their commercial aims.

Barrister William Chapman, representing the abused victims, argued that the social media companies were not taking adequate measures to prevent paedophiles from reaching out to  children online due to their business models and that the time had come for these platforms to be ‘fundamentally redesigned’. Few recommendations shared by the victims before the inquiry for the tech companies included paying compensation to the children abused by their services and to ban posing as a child online, without reasonable excuse.

 
 

According to the BBC, a man named Richard Thomas was jailed for two years six months at Liverpool Crown Court after admitting three counts of making indecent images of children, one of encouraging the commission by another of the offence of distributing indecent images of a child, and one of breaching a sexual harm prevention order.

He was also ordered to be on the sex offenders register for life.

 

Technology companies, Facebook, Google, Apple, BT, and Microsoft have been accused of failing to prevent the online abuse of children. and will have to provide evidence on the adequacy of initiatives taken by them to prevent online abuse before the independent inquiry being held into sexual abuse of children in UK.

Opening the proceedings on Monday, legal counsel Jacqueline Carey shared cases of child abuse online and its devastating impact on their lives.The tech giants would have to provide evidence within the next ten days.

 

The UK’s National Police Chiefs’ Council lead on child protection, Simon Bailey suggests that the only way to force social media companies to pay attention and initiate steps to protect children online is a public boycott. He shared that currently he has not seen any initiatives taken by social media companies that indicate their sincerity to safeguarding children online. He added ‘Ultimately I think the only thing they will genuinely respond to is when their brand is damaged. Ultimately the financial penalties for some of the giants of this world are going to be an absolute drop in the ocean’.

 

 

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) was approached by four US Senators alongside a coalition of 19 civil society organisations (headed by Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, and the Center for Digital Democracy) to launch an investigation into whether Amazon Echo Dot Kids Edition violates the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). The coalition presented the commission with research which exposed, among others, the following vulnerabilities of the system: it is not clear what personal information the device collects, how it uses that information, and whether it shares the information with third parties; Amazon’s system for obtaining parental consent is inadequate and it keeps the audio recordings of children’s voices far longer than necessary; and finally even when parents delete some or all of the recordings of their child, the company does not necessarily delete all of the child’s personal information.

Children’s use of the Internet and mobile technology is increasing, and for many children worldwide there is no clear distinction between the online and offline world. Access to the Internet presents many opportunities for their education, personal development, self-expression, and interaction with others. Yet, the increasingly complex online environment also presents risks for child safety online. Children are especially vulnerable to risks, which include inappropriate content, harmful interactions, commercial issues, and overuse.

When it comes to promoting the benefits of technology for children while at the same time fostering a safe and secure online environment, stakeholders need to strike a careful balance between the need to safeguard children, and the need to respect children’s digital rights. The sections below tackle the security aspect of children’s use of the Internet. Children’s digital rights are tackled from a human rights perspective.

 

Understanding how children use technology and the Internet is crucial for informing policy and initiatives related to children’s online safety. The environment evolves quickly, and is constantly producing new technology that has a significant impact on the lives of children and their safety. Although there is no single blueprint that can universally apply to protecting children online, their attitudes and use of technology and the Internet informs the policy–making processes and mobilises stakeholders to act.

Child safety online: Risks for children and young people

Despite the many benefits of the Internet, children and young people face certain online risks when using the Internet and technology. While users of any age can face risks, children are particularly vulnerable, as they are still in the process of development.

Various classifications of risks have been put forward in studies. They can be synthesised as:

  • inappropriate content, including age-inappropriate content (such as language, violence, sexual content, dating sites, and pro-anorexia sites), and illegal content;
  • inappropriate contact, including being bullied, being a bully, grooming, and harassment;
  • reputational damage and digital footprint: sexting, sharing/sending inappropriate pictures and comments;
  • commercial issues, including spam, hidden costs (such as in-app purchases) and inappropriate advertising (see Figure 4 for examples of commercial practices embedded in apps);
  • overuse, which can interfere with study and sleep.

Online child sexual abuse and exploitation

While the issue of child sexual abuse is not new, the Internet has exacerbated the problem. One of the main reasons is that it provides an easy means of accessing and consuming child sexual abuse content, and of making contact with vulnerable young people.

Some of the sources of online risks for children may result in sexual violence of one kind or another. Children may receive illegal content, such as child sexual abuse images. They can be exposed to predators, leading to grooming and online and/or offline abuse or exploitation. Children can also become perpetrators of illegal activity with a sexually violent component, such as being persuaded to create and share sexual images of themselves, which may then be used to harass or threaten the victim. When content depicting a child being sexually abused is discovered online, there are two clear priorities: to remove the content from public view, and to find the victim of abuse. The victim can then be removed from harm and offered the appropriate support.

Addressing the challenges of child safety online

There is no single solution to mitigate the risks children face using the Internet. Rather, a combination approach can be used to tackle the risks in a broad way. Such an approach combines policy – including legislation, self- and co-regulation – and other measures aimed at creating an appropriate digital environment. It includes also the use of technical tools; and education and awareness. The issues need to be tackled at both national and global level.

The combination approach requires the involvement of all stakeholders. Parents and educators have a responsibility to guide and support children, especially younger children, to use services that promote positive behaviours. They play an important role in education and awareness, which is considered an important first line of defence in mitigating the risks.

Governments and the industry have the responsibility to ensure that the online environment is safe and secure. Service providers can play a key role in creating such an environment, and many tools can be used to this effect. Such tools include filters and reporting mechanisms. The industry favours self- and co-regulation, which has been found to be an effective approach. In addition, it is increasingly recognised that the industry can promote digital citizenship among children and develop products and platforms to help children benefit from ICTs.

Combatting online child sexual abuse and exploitation also requires a concerted effort. This includes appropriate legislation, the work of law enforcement agencies equipped to deal with investigations, technical measures, and education.

These measures on their own are only part of a solution, and must be provided in combination with other measures to achieve the aim of safeguarding children online. Thus, all stakeholders have a responsibility for child safety online, and to protect and fulfil children’s rights.

Events

Actors

(UNHRC)

Privacy and data protection online has been the subject of many UNHRC resolutions.

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Privacy and data protection online has been the subject of many UNHRC resolutions. General resolutions on the promotion and protection of human rights on the Internet have underlined the need for states ensure a balance between cybersecurity measures and the protection of privacy online. The Council has also adopted specific resolutions on the right to privacy in the digital age, emphasising the fact that individuals should not be subjected to arbitrary of unlawful interference with their privacy, either online or offline. The UNHRC has also mandated the Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy to address the issue of online privacy in his reports.

(UNICEF)

UNICEF launched the End Violence Against

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UNICEF launched the End Violence Against Children initiative with a strand focusing on online threats: #ENDviolence online. Under this initiative, it kicked off the #ReplyforAll campaign which advocates for safer Internet for everyone through organising awareness raising activities for children and adolescents and encouraging them to share their inputs on how to respond to online threats. UNICEF is also a partner of the International Telecommunication Union’s Child Online Protection initiative. Additionally, UNICEF produced facts and figures on the Perils and Possibilities: Growing up online. Some of its research focuses on Child Safety Online: Global Challenges and Strategies and ICTs, the Internet and Violence against Children.

(Childnet International)

Childnet’s activities are dedicated to promoting child safety online.

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Childnet’s activities are dedicated to promoting child safety online. The organisation runs various projects, at national and international level, dedicated to empowering children and young people to use the Internet safely. Examples of such initiatives include the Digital Leaders Programme (designed to assist schools in empowering children to use digital technologies safely and positively), the Film Competition (challenging children to create short films about Internet safety), and Project deSHAME (focused on tackling peer-based online sexual exploitation). Childnet also offers children, parents, and teachers and professionals a wide variety of online resources and activities in the area of Internet safety.

(WePROTECT)

The Alliance has developed a c

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The Alliance has developed a comprehensive strategy on ending the sexual exploitation of children online, which outlines the organisation’s commitment to contribute to achieving the vision of more victims of child sexual abuse identified and safeguarded, and more perpetrators apprehended. At national level, the Alliance encourages governments to adopt the WePROTECT Model National Response to Child Sexual Exploitation and Abuse. At international level, it develops and implements initiatives aimed at sharing best practices and developing new tools and techniques to end online child sexual exploitation. The Alliance also works together with the UNICEF-administered Fund to End Violence against Children, and with other international partners.

(CoE)

The Council of Europe has been actively involved in policy discussions on the issue of net neutrality.

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The Council of Europe has been actively involved in policy discussions on the issue of net neutrality. In 2010, the Committee of Ministers adopted a Declaration on network neutrality declaring its commitment to the principle of net neutrality. Later on, and in line with the Council’s Internet Governance Strategy, the Committee adopted a Recommendation on protecting and promoting the right to freedom of expression and the right to private life with regard to network neutrality, calling on member states to safeguard net neutrality in legal frameworks. Issues related to net neutrality and its connections with human rights are also tackled in events organised and studies conducted by the Council.

Instruments

Conventions

Directive 2011/92/EU on combating the sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography (2011)
Convention on Cybercrime (Budapest Convention) (2001)
Link to: Convention on Cybercrime (Budapest Convention) | Article 9 – Offences related to child pornography (2001)

Resolutions & Declarations

Recommendations

Terminology Guidelines for the protection of children from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse (2016)

Other Instruments

Resources

Articles

The Impact of Internet Content Regulation (2002)

Multimedia

Child Safety: A User-Centred Approach to Internet Governance (2nd edition) (2010)

Publications

Internet Governance Acronym Glossary (2015)
An Introduction to Internet Governance (2014)

Reports

Freedom on the Net 2015 (2015)
A Survey on the Transposition of Directive 2011/93/EU on Combating Sexual Abuse and Sexual Exploitation of Child and Child Pornography (2015)
Best Practice Forum on Online Child Protection (2014)
INHOPE Annual Report 2013-2014 (2014)
Confronting New Challenges in the Fight Against Child Pornography (2013)

Conference proceedings

High-Level Round-Table Meeting: Implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals relating to Ending Violence against Children in South Asia (2016)

GIP event reports

EBU Big Data Conference: The discussions during Day 2 (2018)
Safer Internet for Children, Mitigation of Conflicts and Language and Communication for Peace (2017)

Other resources

The Twitter Rules (2016)

Processes

Click on the ( + ) sign to expand each day.

WSIS Forum 2019

WBDS 2019

13th IGF 2018

WSIS Forum 2018

12th IGF 2017

WSIS Forum 2017

IGF 2016

WSIS Forum 2016

WSIS10HL

IGF 2015

WSIS Forum 2016 Report

The protection of children online was discussed in a couple of sessions. Panellists in Child Online Protection: The Road Ahead (session 144) admitted that constant innovations are hard to keep up with. As with other areas, emer- gent patterns of crime - such as cyberbullying, risky self-generated material, and cyber blackmail (also discussed in Student Self-Immune Awareness Program & Addressing the Rising Trend of Cyber Black-mail - session 185) - present a challenge to law enforcement and to industry. Online child sexual exploitation material remains a problem. Interpol’s network rescues more than six children every day, with many of the victims of sexual abuse being pre-pubescent and pre-speech children. 

IGF Report 2015

Child online safety was discussed in a number of sessions, where several key themes emerged. In the workshop on Child Online Protection through Multistakeholder Engagement (WS 6), panellists emphasised the role of stakeholders in combating the threats. Best practices discussed during the workshop showed that in Indonesia, this is being tackled through legal frameworks, cultural and educational initiatives, and technical approaches including parental guidance apps and software. In the UK, an equally alarming number of people have been involved in offences related to child sexual abuse material; this growing phenomenon requires a multistakeholder approach to deal with such cases.When it comes to online child sexual abuse, the Internet has amplified this growing phenomenon, as perpetrators hide behind a veil of anonymity and false identities to evade law enforcement. It is here that issues related to online child sexual abuse intersect with other issues related to security, encryption, and anonymity.

One of the issues related to child sexual abuse material (CSAM) – that of grey area content which sits on the verge between legal and illegal – was discussed in No Grey Area – Against Sexual Exploitation of Children (WS 49). Such images may not be illegal in every country but are harmful both to children posing – such as in highly sexualised images – and to children who are shown these images as part of a perpetrator’s grooming process.

Developments in technology used to identify CSAM are being made. For example, speakers described programmes which are being used to identify CSAM through key terms used by perpetrators to search for content.

The Dynamic Coalition on Child Online Safety also described the use of hash technology (digital fingerprints of photos) and databases to identify CSAM. Many of the images are copies of originals, and in some cases, thousands of copies of the same image exist. Hash lists could identify duplicates with the aim of stopping the revictimisation of children every time the images are seen, and find new images with the aim of identifying and rescuing the victims, and identifying and prosecuting the perpetrators.

From the discussions at IGF 2015, it is clear that significant developments are expected in the technology used to identify new CSAM. More advanced technology – and cooperation among stakeholders – will enable authorities, especially law enforcement, to better combat CSAM.

 

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