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Denmark

For more than two decades, the Danish government has engaged in a close partnership with local municipalities and regions to develop a strong digital foundation. This approach has elevated Denmark to leading positions in numerous digital rankings at both the European and global levels. Denmark has achieved top marks in the European Commission’s Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI) and the UN E-Government Survey. Denmark was the first country to appoint an ambassador for tech diplomacy back in 2017.

Internet governance

Internet governance in Denmark focuses on digitalization, cybersecurity, and e-government initiatives to ensure a secure and efficient digital landscape. Denmark emphasizes collaborative efforts domestically and internationally to defend against cyber threats and espionage, protect critical ICT infrastructure, and enhance digital skills among citizens and businesses. The country promotes responsible, democratic, and safe technology development through initiatives like the Tech for Democracy, and Tech Diplomacy.

Denmark was the first country to appoint an ambassador for tech diplomacy back in 2017. The first tech ambassador set up an office in Silicon Valley in 2017, to be close to the big players in the tech sector, eager to start a more focused and intensive dialogue with companies like Google and Facebook.

Denmark’s stakeholders are active participants in various internet governance forums and initiatives at the regional and global levels. Danish stakeholders also participate in the European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG) events, which bring together stakeholders from the region to discuss digital policy-related issues and challenges. At the global level, Denmark is a member of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF).

Denmark also has a national internet governance initiative called Danish IGF, which was established as a bottom-up, multistakeholder platform for discussing internet-related public policy issues within the country.

Digital strategies

Denmark has implemented several digital strategies aimed at harnessing the power of technology to drive economic growth, enhance public services, promote innovation, and ensure digital inclusion.

  • National Strategy for Digitalisation (2022-2026) Launched in May 2022, this strategy is based on the recommendations from the Danish Government Digitisation Partnership, aiming to integrate digital technologies into Danish society effectively. It emphasizes broad collaboration across public, private, and civil society sectors and is anchored around nine visions, including strengthened cyber and information security, coherent services for individuals and businesses, and acceleration of the green transition through digital solutions​.
  • Digital Growth Strategy 2025 is an initiative launched by the Danish government in collaboration with various stakeholders. The strategy aims to foster the digital transformation processes on a national level and cultivate a highly skilled talent pool of professionals. It consists of 6 pillars and 38 concrete initiatives designed to enhance Denmark’s position as a leading country in digital transformation and digital skills. 
Cybersecurity

Denmark has taken several steps to enhance its cybersecurity capabilities and resilience in recent years. Some of these steps are:

  • The National Cyber Crime Centre (NC3) was established under the Danish National Police in 2014. NC3 increases and strengthens the work of the district police on investigative, preventive and research areas related to cybercrime in terms of enhanced qualifications and greater capacity, as well as considerable investments in technology.
  • Cyber Centre at the Danish Security and Intelligence Service (PET), has a special Cyber Centre that specifically addresses intelligence and investigation tasks relating to cyber threats affecting national security.
  • Centre for Cyber ​​Security (CFCS), was established in 2012 as part of the Defence Intelligence Service. CFCS is the national IT security authority, Network Security Service and National Centre of Excellence within cybersecurity.
  • Denmark has two national response teams (CSIRTs): The Danish Computer Emergency Response Team for Research and Educational Institutions DKCERT, which was established in 2009; and The Danish Government Computer Emergency Response Team: Danish GovCERT. Since July 2016, a new notification system has been in place for companies and authorities reporting cyber incidents.
  • The National Strategy for Cyber and Information Security 2022-2024 was adopted in 2022 and focuses on ensuring secure ICT operations in government as well as empowering citizens and businesses to navigate the digital realm securely.
  • Denmark has ratified CoE Convention on Cybercrime (Budapest Convention).
AI strategies and policies

In 2019, Denmark launched its National Strategy for Artificial Intelligence, aimed at maximizing AI’s potential while adhering to ethical standards and frameworks. The strategy’s goal is to establish Denmark as a forefront runner in the ethical utilisation of AI, fostering innovation and mitigating the risks linked with AI technology. It emphasises the significance of research, development, and educational efforts in AI to strengthen the nation’s economy and enhance public services.

The strategy highlights the critical need for education and training in AI, calling upon the Danish government to establish a vocational adult education and training advisory group. This group’s mission is to assess the labour market’s competency requirements in response to technological and digital advancements, including AI. It will explore the necessity for new initiatives, such as launching new educational programs, conducting analyses, and initiating development projects to meet these evolving needs.

Denmark and its stakeholders are also actively involved in international collaboration on AI research. For example, researchers from Aalborg University are collaborating with researchers from the US and Australia to develop algorithms that can manage systems associated with great uncertainty, with funding from the Independent Research Fund Denmark.

Notable AI companies in Denmark include Tradeshift, a business commerce platform that uses AI for payments and procurement tasks, and Creative Force, an end-to-end creative operations workflow platform that leverages AI to improve communication and collaboration in e-commerce content production. The Danish AI startup landscape has seen significant growth, with two-thirds of the identified AI startups being founded in the past four years. Many of these startups are centred in Copenhagen, where universities with significant AI activities and investors are concentrated.

The AI market size is expected to show an annual growth rate (CAGR 2024-2030) of 16.80%, resulting in a market volume of USD 7.59 bn by 2030.

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General profile

Official name: Kingdom of Denmark

Source: Wikipedia

National internet domain: DK

Source: Wikipedia

Area: 42,933 km2

Source: Wikipedia

Capital: Copenhagen

Source: Wikipedia

Population: 5,9 million

Source: Wikipedia

Population growth: 0.43

Annual population growth rate for year t is the exponential rate of growth of midyear population from year t-1 to t, expressed as a percentage. Population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship.
Source: World Bank Open Data

Life expectancy at birth: 81.55

Total years (2020year) Source: databank.worldbank.org

Rule of law estimate: 1.94

Rule of Law captures perceptions of the extent to which agents have confidence in and abide by the rules of society, and in particular the quality of contract enforcement, property rights, the police, and the courts, as well as the likelihood of crime and violence. Estimate gives the country's score ranging from approximately -2.5 to 2.5 (Estimate 2021)
Source: databank.worldbank.org

Regulatory quality estimate: 1.79

Regulatory Quality captures perceptions of the ability of the government to formulate and implement sound policies and regulations that permit and promote private sector development. Estimate gives the country's score ranging from approximately -2.5 to 2.5 (Estimate 2021)
Source: databank.worldbank.org

Political stability: 0.95

Political Stability and Absence of Violence / Terrorism: measures perceptions of the likelihood that the government will be destabilized or overthrown by unconstitutional or violent means, including politically-motivated violence and terrorism. Estimate gives the country's score ranging from approximately -2.5 to 2.5 (Estimate 2021)
Source: databank.worldbank.org

Economic info

Currency: Euro

Source: Wikipedia

Unemployment: 4.8

Unemployment, total (% of total labor force) Source: databank.worldbank.org

GDP (current US$): 397 billion

Source: databank.worldbank.org

GDP growth (annual %): 4.69

Source: databank.worldbank.org

GDP per capita (current US$): 67,803.05

Source: databank.worldbank.org

Inflation, consumer prices (annual %): 1.85

Source: databank.worldbank.org

GNI (current US$): 409 billion

The Gross National Income, GNI, formerly referred to as gross national product (GNP), measures the total domestic and foreign value added claimed by residents, at a given period in time, usually a year, expressed in current US dollars using the World Bank Atlas method. GNI comprises GDP plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from non-resident sources. Source: databank.worldbank.org

Ease of doing business score: 85.29

The ease of doing business score benchmarked economies concerning their proximity to the best performance in each area measured by Doing Business for the year 2019. Estimate gives the country's score ranging from0 = lowest performance to 100 = best performance Source: databank.worldbank.org
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Digital profile

Internet and social media penetration:

Individuals using the internet 98.9

Source: Individuals using the internet, total (%)www.itu.int

Social media statistics: 5.87 million

Estimate for 2024
Source: datareportal.com

Male internet users: 98.5 (2021)

Male internet users as a % of total male population
Source: www.itu.int

Facebook users: 3.40 million

Estimate for 2024
Source: datareportal.com

Female internet users: 99.3 (2021)

Female Internet users as a % of total female population
Source: www.itu.int

Instagram users: 2.50 million

Estimate for 2024
Source: datareportal.com

Households with internet access at home: 96.1 (2021)

Source: Households with internet access at home (%) www.itu.int

Linkedin users: 3.30 million

Estimate for 2024
Source: datareportal.com

Fixed broadband subscriptions: 44.5 (2021)

Total fixed broadband subscriptions (per 100 people) refers to fixed subscriptions to high-speed access to the public internet (a TCP/IP connection), at downstream speeds equal to, or greater than, 256 kbit/s.
Source: www.itu.int

Twitter users: 1.06 million

Estimate for 2024
Source: datareportal.com

Mobile infrastructure and access:

Mobile ownership: 98.73

Mobile phone ownership as a % of total population (Estimate for 2022)
Source: https://www.mobileconnectivityindex.com/

Mobile Infrastructure: 97.9

Mobile Infrastructure index: High-performance mobile internet coverage availability. It includes parameters such as network coverage, performance, quality of supporting infrastructure and amount of spectrum assigned to mobile network operators (Estimate for 2022)
Source: https://www.mobileconnectivityindex.com/

Male mobile ownership: 82.5 (2016)

Male mobile phone ownership as a % of total male population
Source: www.itu.int

Mobile Affordability: 78.3

Mobile Affordability index : The availability of mobile services and devices at price points that reflect the level of income across a national population. It includes parameters such as mobile tariffs, headset prices, taxation and inequality (Estimate for 2022)
Source: https://www.mobileconnectivityindex.com/

Female mobile ownership: 51.6 (2017)

Female mobile phone ownership as a % of total female population
Source: www.itu.int

Cybersecurity Index: 92.6

Cybersecurity Index (Estimate for 2021): ITU cybersecurity value
Source: www.itu.int

Network performance: 95.3

Network performance index: Quality of mobile services measured by download speed, upload speed and latencies (Estimate for 2022)
Source: https://www.mobileconnectivityindex.com/

Mobile download speeds: 100.0

Mobile download speeds: Average download speed for mobile users (originally in Mbit/s) (Estimate for 2022)
Source: Ookla's Speedtest Intelligence

Mobile uploads speeds: 100.0

Mobile uploads speeds: average uploads speed for mobile users (originally in Mbit/s) (Estimate for 2022)
Source: Ookla's Speedtest Intelligence

Mobile Latencies: 91.3

Mobile Latencies: Average latency for mobile users (originally in milliseconds) (Estimate for 2022)
Source: Ookla's Speedtest Intelligence

Speedtest-Broadband: 170.38

Speedtest-Broadband: The value is expressed in Mbps (Estimate for 2021)
Source: https://www.speedtest.net/global-index

Network coverage: 99.8

Network coverage (% of total population) (Estimate for 2022)
Source: https://www.mobileconnectivityindex.com/

2G Coverage: 100.0

Coverage % of population
Source: www.itu.int

3G Coverage: 100.0

Coverage % of population
Source: https://www.mobileconnectivityindex.com/

4G Coverage: 100.0

Coverage % of population
Source: https://www.mobileconnectivityindex.com/

5G Coverage: 98.5

Coverage % of population
Source: https://www.mobileconnectivityindex.com/

Operating system and browser market share estimate:

Operating system market share (%):

Desktop, Tablet & Console Operating System Market Share: Estimate for 2024
Source: https://gs.statcounter.com/

Browser market share (%):

Browser Market Share Worldwide: Estimate for 2024
Source: https://gs.statcounter.com/

Windows: 49.73

Chrome: 60.9

iOS: 20.43

Safari: 23

Android: 13.8

Edge: 9.57

OS X: 12.12

Firefox: 2.48

Chrome OS: 2.53

Samsung Internet: 1.87


The UN E-Government Survey 2022:

The UN E-Government Survey is the assessment of the digital government landscape across all UN member states. The E-Government Survey is informed by over two decades of longitudinal research, with a ranking of countries based on the UN E-Government Development Index (EGDI), a combination of primary data (collected and owned by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs) and secondary data from other UN agencies.
Source:https://publicadministration.un.org/egovkb/en-us/Reports/UN-E-Government-Survey-2022

E-Government Rank: 1

Nations E-Government Development Index (EGDI), a combination of primary data (collected and owned by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs) and secondary data from other UN agencies. Estimate gives the country's rank.
Source: https://publicadministration.un.org/egovkb/en-us/data-center

E-Government Index: 0.97

The EGDI is a composite measure of three important dimensions of e-government, namely: provision of online services, telecommunication connectivity and human capacity. Estimate gives the country's score ranging from approximately 0 to 1.
Source: https://publicadministration.un.org/egovkb/en-us/data-center

E-Participation Index: 0.89

The E-Participation Index (EPI) is derived as a supplementary index to the United Nations E-Government Survey. Estimate gives the country's score ranging from approximately 0 to 1.
Source: https://publicadministration.un.org/egovkb/en-us/data-center

Online Service Index: 0.98

The online services index was developed by the UN to evaluate the scope and quality of government online services. Estimate gives the country's score ranging from approximately 0 to 1.
Source: https://publicadministration.un.org/egovkb/en-us/data-cente

Human Capital Index: 0.96

The Human Capital Index (HCI) quantiï¬_x0081_es the contribution of health and education to the productivity of the next generation of workers. Estimate gives the country's score ranging from approximately 0 to 1.
Source: https://publicadministration.un.org/egovkb/en-us/data-center

Telecommunication Infrastructure Index: 0.98

Telecommunication Infrastructure Index- Telecommunication Infrastructure Index (TII) Composite Indicator that measures the countries' Telecommunication infrastructure readiness to adopt the opportunities offered by Information and Communication Technology as to enhance their competitiveness. Estimate gives the country's score ranging from approximately 0 to 1.
Source: https://publicadministration.un.org/egovkb/en-us/data-center

ICT information:

ICT skills

Information economy indicators

Individuals with basic ICT skills (%): 76.2 (2021)

Source: www.itu.int

Share of ICT goods, % of total exports (value) 3.94 (2021)

Source: https://unctadstat.unctad.org/

Individuals with standard ICT skills (%): 57 (2021)

Source: www.itu.int

Share of ICT goods, % of total import (value): 7.41 (2021)

Source: https://unctadstat.unctad.org/

Individuals with advanced ICT skills (%): 10.9 (2021)

Source: www.itu.int

Most visited website: ekstrabladet.dk

The survey conducted in 2022 excluded global dominant sites (e.g., YouTube, Facebook, and Google) and search engines (e.g., Yahoo, Baidu, DuckDuckGo, Naver, and Yandex) to level the playing field and discount middle-man visits. Likewise, it did not include adult, betting, illegal streaming/downloading services, and malicious websites.
Source: https://www.hostinger.com/tutorials/the-most-visited-website-in-every-country

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