Brunei will establish National Cybersecurity Centre

20 Mar 2019

Brunei's Minister of Transport and Information Communications, Abdul Mutalib announced the establishment of a National Cybersecurity Centre that will help monitor and co-ordinate response to cyber-threats. Brunei is working on its government strategy to use technology for economic gain and prosperity. Mutalib commented on the creation of the Unified National Network that would consolidate the network infrastructure of all existing telecommunication operators in the country in order to guarantee broadband access for all consumers.

 

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Cybersecurity is among the main concerns of governments, Internet users, technical and business communities. Cyberthreats and cyberattacks are on the increase, and so is the extent of the financial loss. 

Yet, when the Internet was first invented, security was not a concern for the inventors. In fact, the Internet was originally designed for use by a closed circle of (mainly) academics. Communication among its users was open.

Cybersecurity came into sharper focus with the Internet expansion beyond the circle of the Internet pioneers. The Internet reiterated the old truism that technology can be both enabling and threatening. What can be used to the advantage of society can also be used to its disadvantage.

The telecommunications infrastructure is a physical medium through which all Internet traffic flows.

Internet access is growing rapidly, yet large groups of people remain unconnected to the Internet. As of 2015, about 43% of people had access to the Internet (in developing countries only 34%). Access to ICTs is part of the Sustainable Development Agenda, which commits to ‘significantly increase access to ICTs and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020’ (Goal 9.c).

 

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