Is Women's Rights a forbidden subject?

1 Mar 2018

Reporters Without Borders (RSF) published a report Women's Rights: Forbidden Subject to mark International Women's Day. The RSF announcement states that the report 'sheds light on the difficulties that journalists – both men and women – can encounter when they cover women’s rights'. The report covers five areas (chapter headings) to illustrate its points:

1. Covering women’s rights can kill

2. A range of abuses to silence journalists

3. Leading predators

4. Authoritarian regimes

5. Shut up or resist

Explore the issues

Women's rights online address online aspects of traditional women rights with respect to discrimination in the exercise of rights, the right to hold office, the right to equal pay and the right to education. Women represent more than half of the world’s population, yet their participation in technology-mediated processes is an area where progress is still needed.

The human rights basket includes online aspects of freedom of expression, privacy and data protection, rights of people with disabilities and women’s rights online. Yet, other human rights come into place in the realm of digital policy, such as children’s rights, and rights afforded to journalists and the press.

The same rights that people have offline must also be protected online is the underlying principle for human rights on the Internet, and has been firmly established by the UN General Assembly and UN Human Rights Council resolutions.

Several international instruments guarantee the right to freedom of expression. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights affirms that this right includes the freedom to hold opinion without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas. The Internet, with the opportunity it offers people to express themselves, is seen as an enabler of the exercise of this particular human right. Although these freedoms are guaranteed in global instruments and in national constitutions, in some countries freedom of expression is often curtailed through online censorship or filtering mechanisms, imposed by states, often for political reasons.

 

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