WIPO becomes dispute resolution provider for .eu and .ею

16 May 2017

The Arbitration and Mediation Centre of the World Intellectual Property Organisation will become an alternative dispute resolution (ADR) provider for the .eu and .ею top-level domains (TLDs), as of June 2017. As announced by EURid, the registry for the two TLDs, holders of a trademark, trade name, company name, or other rights will be able to use the services of the WIPO Arbitration and Mediation Centre to dispute potentially speculative and abusive .eu and .ею domain name registrations The Centre becomes the second ADR provider, in addition to the current Czech Arbitration Court.

Explore the issues

The Domain Name System (DNS) handles Internet domain names (such as www.google.com) and converts them to Internet Protocol (IP) numbers (and the other way around).

Arbitration is a dispute resolution mechanism available in place of traditional courts. Such mechanisms are used extensively to fill the gap engendered by the inability of current international private law to deal with Internet cases. An example is the Universal Domain-Name Dispute-Resolution Policy (UDRP), which was developed by WIPO and implemented by ICANN as the primary dispute resolution procedure.

In arbitrations, decisions are made by one or more independent individuals chosen by the disputants. The mechanism is usually set out in a private contract, which also specifies issues as place of arbitration, procedures, and choice of law. International arbitration within the business sector has a long-standing tradition.

Knowledge and ideas are key resources in the global economy. The protection of knowledge and ideas, through IPR, has become one of the predominant issues in the Internet governance debate, and has a strong development-oriented component. Internet-related IPR include copyright, trademarks, and patents.

Trademarks are relevant to the Internet because of the registration of domain names. In the early phase of Internet development, the registration of domain names was based on a first come, first served basis. This led to cybersquatting, the practice of registering names of companies and selling them later at a higher price.

 

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