UK plans to develop new laws to ensure safety in cyberspace

20 May 2018

UK’s Digital Secretary Matt Hancock has announced new plans to create regulation to ensure that ‘the UK is the safest place in the world to be online’. According to the British government, there is a lack of sufficient oversight or transparency for technology companies, resulting in inappropriate and harmful content online, ranging from cyberbullying and intimidation to online child sexual exploitation and extremist material. While working closely with industry, the government will work on a white paper, to be published later this year, which will draft legislation against digital harms. The move is part of the UK’s Internet Safety Strategy.

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Children’s use of the Internet and mobile technology is increasing, and for many children worldwide there is no clear distinction between the online and offline world. Access to the Internet presents many opportunities for their education, personal development, self-expression, and interaction with others.

Cybersecurity is among the main concerns of governments, Internet users, technical and business communities. Cyberthreats and cyberattacks are on the increase, and so is the extent of the financial loss. 

Yet, when the Internet was first invented, security was not a concern for the inventors. In fact, the Internet was originally designed for use by a closed circle of (mainly) academics. Communication among its users was open.

Cybersecurity came into sharper focus with the Internet expansion beyond the circle of the Internet pioneers. The Internet reiterated the old truism that technology can be both enabling and threatening. What can be used to the advantage of society can also be used to its disadvantage.

Cybercrime is crime committed via the Internet and computer systems. One category of cybercrimes are those affecting the confidentiality, integrity and availability of data and computer systems; they include: unauthorised access to computer systems, illegal interception of data transmissions, data interference (damaging, deletion, deterioration, alteration of suppression of data), system interf

One of the main sociocultural issues is content policy, often addressed from the standpoints of human rights (freedom of expression and the right to communicate), government (content control), and technology (tools for content control). Discussions usually focus on three groups of content:

 

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