UK launches Duty of Care Campaign

31 Jan 2019

The UK Parliament members have concluded that it is the  ‘legal duty of care  of online companies and social media platforms to act to protect young users online. The government has been tasked to examine legislations to ensure online companies share necessary data to help, identify, and protect children online. Further, a report by the Commons Science and Technology Committee highlighted how the existing ‘patchwork’ of regulation has resulted in a ‘standards lottery’ which does not ensure safety of children online, recommending the government to set a target to reduce online sexual abuse of children by halve within two years and eliminate it in four years.

Explore the issues

The human rights basket includes online aspects of freedom of expression, privacy and data protection, rights of people with disabilities and women’s rights online. Yet, other human rights come into place in the realm of digital policy, such as children’s rights, and rights afforded to journalists and the press.

The same rights that people have offline must also be protected online is the underlying principle for human rights on the Internet, and has been firmly established by the UN General Assembly and UN Human Rights Council resolutions.

Children’s use of the Internet and mobile technology is increasing, and for many children worldwide there is no clear distinction between the online and offline world. Access to the Internet presents many opportunities for their education, personal development, self-expression, and interaction with others.

 

The GIP Digital Watch observatory is provided by

in partnership with

and members of the GIP Steering Committee



 

GIP Digital Watch is operated by

Scroll to Top