Maryland Senate votes to update state cyber-bullying law

10 Feb 2019

In the USA, the Senate of of Maryland has voted to update state laws against cyber-bullying of children. The measures propose to widen the scope of the law to  only include cyber-bullying, update the definition of electronic communication, and emphasise that it is applicable even for a single significant act, instead of requiring multiple examples of bullying acts. The proposed measure is  named ‘Grace’s Law 2.0’ in memory of 15 year old Grace McComas of Woodbine, a teenager who killed herself after being cyber-bullied repeatedly on social media.

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Children’s use of the Internet and mobile technology is increasing, and for many children worldwide there is no clear distinction between the online and offline world. Access to the Internet presents many opportunities for their education, personal development, self-expression, and interaction with others.

Women's rights online address online aspects of traditional women rights with respect to discrimination in the exercise of rights, the right to hold office, the right to equal pay and the right to education. Women represent more than half of the world’s population, yet their participation in technology-mediated processes is an area where progress is still needed.

The human rights basket includes online aspects of freedom of expression, privacy and data protection, rights of people with disabilities and women’s rights online. Yet, other human rights come into place in the realm of digital policy, such as children’s rights, and rights afforded to journalists and the press.

The same rights that people have offline must also be protected online is the underlying principle for human rights on the Internet, and has been firmly established by the UN General Assembly and UN Human Rights Council resolutions.

 

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