Facebook accused of leaving 'children broken as collateral damage' by UK inquiry

24 May 2019

During an Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA), where evidence from various online companies such as Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, and Google on the initiatives taken by them to combat child abuse online was heard, Facebook has been accused of leaving 'broken children as collateral damage' for their commercial aims.

Barrister William Chapman, representing the abused victims, argued that the social media companies were not taking adequate measures to prevent paedophiles from reaching out to  children online due to their business models and that the time had come for these platforms to be ‘fundamentally redesigned’. Few recommendations shared by the victims before the inquiry for the tech companies included paying compensation to the children abused by their services and to ban posing as a child online, without reasonable excuse.

 
 

Explore the issues

Cybersecurity is among the main concerns of governments, Internet users, technical and business communities. Cyberthreats and cyberattacks are on the increase, and so is the extent of the financial loss. 

Yet, when the Internet was first invented, security was not a concern for the inventors. In fact, the Internet was originally designed for use by a closed circle of (mainly) academics. Communication among its users was open.

Cybersecurity came into sharper focus with the Internet expansion beyond the circle of the Internet pioneers. The Internet reiterated the old truism that technology can be both enabling and threatening. What can be used to the advantage of society can also be used to its disadvantage.

Consumer trust is one of the main preconditions for the success of e-commerce. E-commerce is still relatively new and consumers are not as confident with it as with real-world shopping. Consumer protection is an important legal method for developing trust in e-commerce.

One of the main sociocultural issues is content policy, often addressed from the standpoints of human rights (freedom of expression and the right to communicate), government (content control), and technology (tools for content control). Discussions usually focus on three groups of content:

Children’s use of the Internet and mobile technology is increasing, and for many children worldwide there is no clear distinction between the online and offline world. Access to the Internet presents many opportunities for their education, personal development, self-expression, and interaction with others.

 

The GIP Digital Watch observatory is provided by

 

 

and members of the GIP Steering Committee



 

GIP Digital Watch is operated by

Scroll to Top