DC-CIV Evolving Regulation and its impact on Core Internet Values | IGF 2023

10 Oct 2023 07:20h - 08:50h UTC

Event report

Speakers and Moderators

Speakers:
  • Vint CERF, Internet Evangelist, Google, Business Community, WEOG
  • Jane Coffin, Senior Executive International Infrastructure and Internet Issues, Connect Humanity, Civil Society, WEOG
  • Nii Quaynor, Chairman of the Board, Ghana.Com, Business Community, AFRICA
  • Iria Puyosa, DFRLab, Atlantic Council, Civil Society, GRULAC
  • Lee Rainie, Former Director, Internet and Technology research at Pew Research Center, Civil Society, WEOG
Moderators:
  • Sébastien Bachollet,
  • Alejandro Pisanty, UNAM, Academic Community, GRULAC

Table of contents

Disclaimer: This is not an official record of the IGF session. The DiploAI system automatically generates these resources from the audiovisual recording. Resources are presented in their original format, as provided by the AI (e.g. including any spelling mistakes). The accuracy of these resources cannot be guaranteed. The official record of the session can be found on the IGF's official website.

Knowledge Graph of Debate

Session report

Sébastien Bachollet

The internet, a network of networks, is a global medium that operates on open protocols such as TCP, IP, and BGP. It is free from centralized control and promotes open and interoperable communication worldwide. This highlights the positive aspect of the internet, emphasizing its ability to connect people and facilitate the exchange of information.

However, financial challenges are impacting internet freedom. As the world economy struggles to recover, what was previously offered for free on the internet may no longer make financial sense for companies providing services. This negative aspect raises concerns about potential limitations and restrictions that may arise due to economic constraints.

In response to these challenges, governments are actively involved in drafting and implementing regulations concerning internet governance. Notable examples include the UK's online safety bills, the Australian Online Safety Act, the European Digital Services Act, Digital Market Act, and the US Kids Online Safety Act. This neutral argument suggests that governments are taking steps to ensure the safety, security, and responsible use of the internet.

Amidst these discussions, defenders of the core values of the internet emphasize the importance of preserving certain principles. The Dynamic Coalition on Co-Internet Value promotes permissionless innovation, which allows for the unrestricted development and deployment of new technologies and services. This is seen as a positive stance that supports the notion of an open and innovative internet.

Overall, the analysis illustrates the complex nature of the internet and its evolving landscape. While the internet offers open and interoperable communication, financial challenges pose a threat to internet freedom. Governments are actively intervening through regulatory measures, and defenders of internet values highlight the importance of preserving the core principles that have contributed to its success. The promotion of permissionless innovation adds another layer to the discussion, highlighting the need for ongoing innovation and development in the digital realm.

Audience

The provided summary examines various arguments and viewpoints concerning the security, reliability, and anonymity of the internet. It highlights the increasing dependence on the internet and the rising number of security breaches, emphasising the need to enhance its security and reliability.

On the other hand, the summary acknowledges the struggle with the need for identification on the internet. While identification is necessary for certain purposes, the concept of anonymity is also seen as significant. It argues that anonymity should be considered a fundamental value of the internet and advocates for the development of a standard that can combine both security and anonymity.

Furthermore, the summary supports the creation of a trusted service that promotes secure anonymity on the internet. The benefits of such a service are not explicitly stated; however, it can be inferred that it would provide a secure platform for users to maintain their privacy online.

The summary also brings attention to the concept of communications metadata security, suggesting that it may be a more accurate term than anonymity. It explains that the term "anonymity" can be misleading and proposes that the focus should be on protecting the security of communications metadata.

In addition, the summary mentions the use of Tor for accessing services like Facebook, highlighting the advantages it offers. It allows users to have control over the level of communication metadata they reveal, ensuring their privacy and security online.

Furthermore, it discusses the network layer of the internet, emphasising that identification is not automatically performed at this level. This suggests that users have the ability to choose whether or not to disclose their identity.

The summary concludes by suggesting that it might be beneficial, both in a societal and platform context, to have the option of identifying oneself at a different layer of the internet. This implies that users should have the flexibility to choose when and how they reveal their identity online.

Overall, the extended summary provides a comprehensive overview of the arguments and viewpoints regarding internet security, reliability, and anonymity. It touches on the perspectives of enhanced security, the need for anonymity, the concept of communications metadata security, and the importance of user control over identification.

Lee Rainie

The analysis highlights the issue of internet fragmentation and its impact on various aspects of society. One significant finding is that a staggering 2.6 billion people currently lack access to and use of the internet. This statistic emphasizes the importance of addressing the digital divide and ensuring equal access to the internet for all individuals.

The impact of the internet is further explored through four major revolutions: home broadband, mobile connectivity, social media, and artificial intelligence. Home broadband revolutionised the internet by making it an essential utility in people's lives. Mobile connectivity then increased the speed of information access and communication. Social media expanded social networks, connecting people globally. Lastly, the emergence of artificial intelligence brought both promising possibilities and fears.

However, it is important to acknowledge that these internet revolutions have also led to social, cultural, and legal fragmentation. Different experiences have emerged across various segments of society, including differences based on class, gender, age, race, ethnicity, religious affiliation, awareness, optimism, and individual behaviours. These disparities highlight the need to address inequalities and ensure that the benefits of the internet are accessible to everyone.

Another significant finding suggests that individuals often perceive themselves as managing the internet better than society as a whole. This perception may stem from personal proficiency or satisfaction with their own internet usage. However, this self-perception does not necessarily align with the overall societal impact of the internet, which may still face challenges and inequalities.

In terms of technology policy, the analysis reveals a growing trend towards partisanship. Previously, there may have been a consensus on issues like anonymity, but that consensus seems to be diminishing. Signs of polarization are evident in the dynamics of populist mainstream parties in Europe. This partisan shift in tech policy raises concerns about the ability to reach effective and inclusive regulations and policies.

The analysis concludes by suggesting that the current dynamic in tech policy is fluid and unsettled. Discussions surrounding technology and its regulation suggest an environment where things are constantly evolving and difficult to settle. This observation underscores the complexity and challenges in shaping a cohesive and inclusive tech policy framework.

Overall, the analysis highlights the need to address internet fragmentation, overcome inequalities caused by the different experiences of internet revolutions, and find ways to address partisan tensions in tech policy. By tackling these challenges, policymakers and society can work towards a more equal, inclusive, and beneficial internet ecosystem for all.

Alejandro Pisanty

Regulation proposals in the context of the internet have raised concerns regarding their potential infringement on the core values of the internet. It is believed that these regulations may have a negative impact on the technical principles with which the internet was built. This concern stems from the assumption that such core internet values are primarily rooted in these technical principles. The sentiment towards these regulation proposals is generally negative, highlighting the need to carefully consider their potential consequences.

One of the main concerns regarding regulation proposals is the potential reduction in the universality of the internet's reach. There is a risk that these regulations may limit the accessibility and availability of the internet, thereby undermining its global reach. Additionally, it is argued that these regulations may also lead to a reduction in interoperability, making it more difficult for different systems and platforms to effectively communicate with one another.

In order to enhance security, there is a suggestion that additional devices might be necessary for stronger authentication or identification. This highlights the need for ongoing technological advancements to address the evolving challenges of cybersecurity and digital identity verification.

However, it is crucial to implement regulations carefully in order to strike a balance between enforcement and the preservation of core internet values. The focus should be on finding a middle ground that allows for the regulation of the internet while ensuring that the underlying principles that shaped its development are not compromised. This approach is considered constructive, as it acknowledges the importance of regulations while also emphasizing the need to safeguard the fundamental values that the internet was built upon.

The topic of trust establishment in the internet also arises, with questions raised about the magnitude of architectural changes that may be required. There are concerns about the scalability of trust systems and whether they can effectively meet the demands of a growing global network. Alejandro Pisanty specifically highlights Estonia's trust system as a brilliant example but potentially limited in its scalability. This insight offers valuable considerations for future developments in trust establishment within the internet infrastructure.

Furthermore, discussions around internet governance touch upon the significance of privacy and online identity. It is argued that individuals should have the choice to identify themselves online without being compelled to disclose personal identification data. This highlights the importance of striking a balance between privacy protection and the necessary security measures in place.

The case of AFRINIC, a regional internet registry, brings attention to the challenges faced by private entities registered in certain jurisdictions. AFRINIC's position as a private entity registered in Mauritius has resulted in numerous court cases, sparking discussions about according technical organizations governing the internet the status of internet government organizations. This observation raises important questions about the governance structure and legal frameworks surrounding the internet.

In conclusion, regulation proposals for the internet have generated concerns about potential infringements on the core values and principles of the internet. Discussions revolve around the need to carefully implement regulations to preserve the internet's universality, interoperability, and core values. The importance of stronger authentication and identification is highlighted, but considerations must be made for the impact on privacy and choice. Trust establishment also comes under scrutiny, with reflections on scalability and architectural changes. The legal status of technical organizations governing the internet is explored, emphasizing the need for effective governance structures in addressing the complexities of the digital age.

Iria Puyosa

The analysis considers various perspectives in the debate on content moderation in encrypted apps and the transnational flow of data. It raises concerns about ill-designed regulation that could potentially disrupt the internet. The argument is that rushed regulation may have unintended consequences and negative effects. This highlights the need for careful planning and comprehensive consideration.

Another important point raised is the focus on harmful content within encrypted message apps. While much of the public conversation revolves around managing harmful content in these apps, research shows that the majority of content in messaging apps is actually useful and positive. This challenges the notion that harmful content is pervasive and questions the urgency of regulation.

Furthermore, the analysis presents an argument against breaking encryption solely for content moderation purposes. It suggests that there are alternative ways to address harmful content without compromising encryption. Breaking encryption in messaging apps could have broader implications and potentially undermine encryption on the internet as a whole. This negative sentiment emphasizes the importance of considering long-term effects on digital security and privacy.

The analysis also emphasizes the significance of considering the transnational flow of data in policy making. Regulations implemented in one country can significantly impact other countries. The extraterritorial nature of data flow is often overlooked in policy discussions. This neutral sentiment highlights the need for a global approach and collaborative efforts to ensure coherent and harmonized regulations that do not have unintended negative consequences on cross-border data flow.

Additionally, the analysis highlights the importance of respecting human rights, the rule of law, and internet integrity. It suggests that solutions should be found that align with these principles. Balancing concerns while maintaining the core principles of the internet is crucial.

The analysis recognizes the need for technical expertise in policy discussions. It emphasizes the importance of individuals with the knowledge and skills to solve problems and implement effective solutions. This observation underscores the intersection of technology and policy and the value of diverse expertise in shaping regulations.

To prevent unintended consequences, the analysis stresses the necessity of input from civil society and a thorough understanding of human rights before implementing regulations. Involving a broad range of voices and perspectives can help avoid exacerbating existing problems or creating new ones.

In conclusion, the analysis highlights the complexities and various perspectives within the content moderation debate in encrypted apps and the transnational flow of data. It underscores the need for well-designed and thoroughly considered regulations that do not compromise internet integrity or undermine encryption. Respecting human rights, the rule of law, and involving technical expertise and civil society in policy discussions are also crucial. A balanced approach is needed to address concerns while upholding the principles and integrity of the internet.

Nii Quaynor

The African Network Information Centre (afriNIC) has faced significant challenges in Mauritius due to local legislation. These challenges have affected afriNIC's ability to develop effective policies and have caused issues with Resource Registry (RR) transfer policies. This legislative impact has had a negative effect on afriNIC.

Despite these challenges, afriNIC's multi-stakeholder approach within the Policy Development Process (PDP) has remained resilient. Draft proposals aimed at hijacking resources have failed to reach consensus, demonstrating the effectiveness of the multi-stakeholder approach in preventing such attempts. Although participation in the PDP has been hindered, leading to the recall of a co-chair, the multi-stakeholder approach has overall been positive for afriNIC.

One argument put forth is that internet identifiers should be managed as public goods, rather than treated as property. Transfer policies in other regions have considered resources as property, but not necessarily for the end user. It is argued that managing internet identifiers as public goods is crucial for their equitable distribution and accessibility.

afriNIC has also faced challenges regarding non-compliance from a member. This member, who had received significant resources but refused to comply with afriNIC's requirements, had their resources recalled as a consequence. This non-compliance has created further difficulties for afriNIC.

Another concern is the need for stronger protections and governance for afriNIC. Despite plans to become a decentralized organization, this transition remains incomplete. Additionally, afriNIC's attempts to seek diplomatic protection have not been successful. These factors highlight the need for improved security measures and governance within afriNIC.

Commercial disputes between non-profit organizations and members have also arisen as a challenge. It has been observed that disputes can occur, raising questions about the effectiveness of the current legal system in resolving such issues.

Furthermore, disapproval has been expressed towards a member who refuses to be disciplined and has abused the legal system by generating multiple court cases. This member has violated rules and even attempted to bribe individuals, undermining the integrity of afriNIC and placing further strain on the legal system.

Lastly, concerns have been raised about business misuse and the potential hijacking of numbers by organizations lacking proper infrastructure. Some organizations have been found to be misusing resources and generating numerous court cases without the necessary business infrastructure. This raises ethical concerns and questions about the proper allocation of resources.

In conclusion, afriNIC has faced various challenges, including legislative barriers, non-compliance from members, commercial disputes, and concerns over business misuse and number hijacking. Despite these challenges, afriNIC's multi-stakeholder approach has shown resilience in the Policy Development Process. However, there is a need for stronger protections, improved governance, and a more efficient legal system to effectively address these issues.

Vint Cerf

The analysis covers a wide range of topics related to internet security, privacy, anonymity, accountability, and the role of technology in filtering harmful internet behaviour.

One area of discussion is the side effects of internet security measures. While governments have enacted laws to protect internet users, there is concern that these laws can be used to inhibit freedom of speech. It is argued that internet security measures have unexpected consequences and may not always achieve the desired outcomes.

The importance of strong authentication is emphasised as a means of preventing unauthorised actions and impersonation. Strong authentication, such as end-to-end cryptography, is seen as a way to protect user information and maintain confidentiality.

Anonymity on the internet is also addressed, with some arguing that it can lead to harmful behaviour. Anonymity is believed to shield individuals engaging in bad behaviour and decrease the consequences for their actions, thereby encouraging harmful actions. However, others argue that mechanisms allowing for identity discovery should be tolerated, as accountability can help prevent harmful actions. The tension between anonymity and accountability is a significant consideration in this debate.

The limitations of technology, such as machine learning, in filtering harmful internet behaviour are highlighted. It is argued that technology fails to effectively filter harmful behaviour and that incorrect filtering can infringe upon individuals' rights.

Certain situations, such as whistleblowing, are seen as necessitating anonymity. Whistleblowers rely on anonymity to protect their identity and ensure their safety, especially when exposing sensitive information.

The need for architectural changes to internet identity is also discussed. The current identifier provided by the internet, the IP address, is seen as insufficient for maintaining security and privacy. Estonia's implementation of strong authentication for its entire population is cited as an example of the potential for significant changes to internet identity.

The importance of accountability over absolute anonymity is emphasised, acknowledging the potential risks associated with identifying individuals by biological metrics. Privacy concerns are balanced against the need for accountability to prevent harmful actions.

Vint Cerf, a prominent figure in the field, argues that absolute anonymity may no longer be a core value that serves the interests of internet users. He also supports the inclusion of a multi-stakeholder perspective in policy formulation, believing it should be a normal practice for governments. The multi-stakeholder model of organisations like the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) is praised for ensuring robust policy-making regulations and engagement with governments.

The value of cryptography in data protection is highlighted, with examples of Google's encryption practices and user-controlled data keys. However, arguments against the idea that data about citizens should be kept within national borders are presented. Keeping data within physical borders is seen as compromising reliability due to the lack of redundancy, while transborder data flows combined with encryption are seen as offering safe data storage options.

The layering mechanism for communications metadata security is appreciated, drawing parallels with other elements of internet design such as the domain name system. The concept of user-choice in revealing identity is viewed positively and considered an important aspect of internet security.

The power of internet exchange points for connectivity is acknowledged, facilitating efficient connections between networks. However, concerns are raised about government-operated exchange points leading to unwanted surveillance if all traffic is required to go through them. It is suggested that cryptography could help secure encrypted traffic running through exchange points.

Furthermore, the challenges of maintaining exchange points and data centres in space are noted, due to the difficulties in accessing these locations and carrying out necessary maintenance.

Lastly, the critical importance of the internet in everyday life is recognised, with global surveys indicating a widespread unwillingness to give it up. The positive impact of the internet on various aspects of society is acknowledged.

In conclusion, the analysis explores complex and diverse perspectives on internet security and related issues. It highlights the need for a balance between security, privacy, anonymity, and accountability. The role of technology in filtering harmful behaviour is examined, and the importance of strong authentication and architectural changes to internet identity is emphasised. The multi-stakeholder approach in policy-making, the value of cryptography in data protection, and the challenges and benefits of internet exchange points and space-based infrastructure are also discussed. Overall, the analysis sheds light on the multifaceted nature of internet security and the ongoing discussions surrounding its various dimensions.

Deborah Allen Rogers

The extended summary discusses the effective e-governance models developed by Finland and Estonia. According to Deborah Allen Rogers, who works with the digital fluency lab Find Out Why, these solutions often go unnoticed. She suggests that promoting learning from and collaborating with Finland and Estonia on their e-governance models is important, as they have been implementing them for about 20 years and have answers to many challenges faced by Europe and the United States in e-governance.

The summary also highlights the crucial role of cryptography in protecting human rights, personal rights, and privacy. It is considered a safe and scalable method for safeguarding information.

Furthermore, the significance of scale in technology is emphasized. Deborah Allen Rogers points out that smaller societies can serve as test samples, and scaling their functional aspects has been successful. The CEO of XRoad, based in Finland, shares insights about their more conservative cultural context in scaling technology compared to Estonia. The summary also mentions that scale changes the concept of what can be done at the push of a button.

It is worth noting that Deborah Allen Rogers has previous experience with drastic transitions, having been a clothing designer during the shift of global manufacturing to China and during the AIDS pandemic, as well as being in New York during the 9/11 attacks. This experience adds credibility to her perspectives.

The functionality of societies is discussed, with Deborah pointing out the difference between highly governed and functional societies, like the Netherlands, and dysfunctional ones. The summary implies that dysfunctional societies may struggle in handling societal aspects effectively.

Finally, the summary emphasizes that the functionality of a society is more important than its size. This notion aligns with the SDGs of reducing inequalities and promoting sustainable cities and communities.

Overall, the extended summary provides a comprehensive overview of the main points, arguments, and evidence discussed in the original text. It also includes Deborah Allen Rogers' insights and experiences, adding depth to the analysis.

Shiva

Internet exchange points (IXPs) are critical infrastructure that facilitate the exchange of internet traffic between different networks. However, there are concerns about the potential impact of IXPs operating on a commercial business model on internet neutrality. Some IXPs operate as for-profit entities, and this could potentially lead to favouritism or discriminatory practices, impacting the principle of net neutrality.

The argument against commercial IXPs is rooted in the belief that when financial interests are prioritized, the impartial exchange of internet traffic may be compromised. This sentiment is reflected in the negative sentiment associated with this argument. The supporting facts suggest that some IXPs do indeed operate on a commercial basis, which raises concerns about the potential erosion of internet neutrality.

Another concern related to IXPs is government regulation. There is a fear that governments could use their regulatory powers to manipulate or control the internet through IXPs. This negative sentiment draws attention to the potential misuse of IXPs as tools for political censorship or surveillance. The related sustainable development goal of SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions highlights the importance of preserving a free and open internet.

On a more neutral note, there are ongoing discussions and considerations for the design of interplanetary internet exchange points. Given the increasing interest in space exploration and the possibility of future interplanetary communication networks, the concept of interplanetary IXPs is being explored. However, limited information is provided regarding this topic, suggesting that more research and development is required.

In conclusion, concerns about the impact of commercial IXPs on internet neutrality and the potential for government control highlight the need for careful regulation and oversight in the management of IXPs. The concept of interplanetary IXPs adds an intriguing dimension to the discussion, emphasizing the evolving nature of internet infrastructure as technology and human exploration progress.

Joseph

The use of Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) is a topic that sparks controversy. VPNs have the ability to bypass internet restrictions, granting users the ability to access sensitive data that may be otherwise blocked. This feature has both positive and negative implications. On one hand, it allows individuals to browse the internet freely, evade censorship and access information that may be crucial in certain circumstances. However, this freedom can also be easily misused, leading to fraudulent activities and infringement on sensitive data.

The argument against the use of VPNs centres around the potential for misuse and harm. Those raising concerns argue that VPNs provide a cloak of anonymity that can enable cybercriminals to carry out illegal activities, such as hacking, fraud and identity theft. By masking their IP addresses and encrypting their online activities, these criminals can disguise their tracks, making it difficult for law enforcement agencies to trace and apprehend them. This creates a significant challenge for cybersecurity and poses a threat to the security of individuals and organisations.

However, it is important to note that VPNs have legitimate applications as well. Many individuals and organisations, such as journalists, activists and businesses, rely on VPNs to protect their sensitive information and maintain privacy. For these users, VPNs provide a layer of security by encrypting their data, making it difficult for hackers or prying eyes to intercept and exploit it. In this context, VPNs are seen as valuable tools for safeguarding data and ensuring the protection of individual content on the internet.

The need for protective measures for individual content on the internet is a relevant concern in today's digital age. As more and more information is stored and shared online, the risk of cyber threats and data breaches increases. This issue is closely linked to topics of internet security, cyber safety and data protection. With the rise of cybercrimes and the increasing value of personal data, it is crucial to find a balance between protecting privacy and ensuring the safety of individuals and society as a whole.

In conclusion, the use of VPNs is a contentious matter. While VPNs can provide internet users with greater freedom and privacy, their potential misuse raises legitimate concerns. The debate surrounding VPNs highlights the importance of balancing individual privacy rights with the need for cybersecurity measures. Solutions that address these concerns while preserving internet accessibility and protecting sensitive data are crucial for tackling this complex issue.

Jane R. Coffin

This extended summary provides a more detailed overview of the main points, arguments, evidence, and conclusions present in the provided text. It also includes noteworthy observations and insights gained from the analysis.

1. Importance of funding small networks in the United States: - The text highlights the importance of funding small networks, specifically in rural and underserved areas. - It recognises the lack of connectivity in certain areas in the US and the need for creative and innovative funding solutions. - The argument is strongly in favour of funding small networks to bridge the digital divide and reduce inequalities in access to the internet.

2. Open connectivity and fewer regulations: - There is a call for open connectivity and the need to reduce regulations to foster innovation. - The text mentions the importance of keeping internet exchange points open with fewer regulations. - The argument is positive and emphasises the benefits of promoting open connectivity for industry, innovation, and infrastructure development.

3. Concerns about the erosion of core internet values: - The text raises concerns about the erosion of openness, interoperability, global connection, and permissionless innovation. - Certain countries and international organisations are observed attempting to regulate internet exchange points. - The argument expresses a negative sentiment towards the potential threat posed to the core values of the internet.

4. Advocacy for community networks and competition in connectivity: - The importance of community networks for building networks that serve the community, with the community, and by the community is emphasised. - The text highlights regulations that prohibit community networks and stresses the need for more network diversification and competition in connectivity. - The argument is in favour of community networks and advocates for their importance in reducing inequalities in access to the internet.

5. Need for inclusive, multi-stakeholder policymaking and regulation: - The text argues for inclusive and multi-stakeholder inclusion in policymaking and regulation. - It suggests that neglecting smaller networks, internet exchange points, and other stakeholders may lead to forced centralisation. - The sentiment is negative towards the exclusion of certain groups and emphasises the importance of diverse perspectives in regulatory decision-making processes.

6. Observations on unintended consequences in policymaking: - The text suggests that excluding civil society, the technical community, and academia from policymaking may lead to unintended consequences and forced centralisation. - The negative sentiment arises from the potential negative impact of excluding certain stakeholders from decision-making processes.

7. The role of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) and the multi-stakeholder model: - The text highlights the obligation of the IGF and the uniqueness of the multi-stakeholder model in working with governments for better policy formation. - The argument is positive, emphasising the need for collaboration between the IGF, governments, and other stakeholders to improve policymaking and regulation.

8. Possibility of exchange points in space with Low Earth Orbiting Satellites (LEOs): - Relevant research funded by the Internet Society Foundation explores the possibility of exchange points in space using LEOs. - The argument remains neutral, presenting this as an area of exploration for future developments in internet infrastructure.

9. Issues surrounding control over traffic in LEO constellation networks: - The complex nature of control over traffic in LEO constellation networks is acknowledged. - Complications arise in negotiating cross-border connectivity issues with transmissions between countries. - The argument takes a negative stance towards a potential concentration of control in the hands of a single entity or company.

10. Acknowledgement of different types of internet exchange points: - The text acknowledges that some countries require traffic monitoring at exchange points. - It recognises the existence and role of both neutral, bottom-up internet exchange points and government-managed ones. - The sentiment is neutral, neither positive nor negative.

11. Support for encryption and potential relevance of cryptocurrencies: - The importance of encryption in protecting the privacy of internet traffic is acknowledged. - While the support for encryption is positive, there is no significant interest expressed in cryptocurrencies at present. - The sentiment is positive, emphasising the importance of privacy and security in internet communications.

12. Overall sentiment towards the future of the internet: - The analysis reveals a positive sentiment towards keeping the internet open, secure, and globally connected. - The text recognises the need for collaboration, open connectivity, and innovative funding solutions to bridge the digital divide and reduce inequalities. - There is a strong emphasis on the core values of the internet and the importance of multi-stakeholder involvement in policymaking and regulation.

In conclusion, the text highlights the importance of funding small networks, the need for open connectivity, and concerns about the erosion of core internet values. It advocates for community networks, competition in connectivity, and inclusive policymaking to avoid forced centralisation. The role of the Internet Governance Forum and the multi-stakeholder model is recognised, and potential developments in internet infrastructure, such as exchange points in space, are explored. Encryption and privacy also receive positive support. Overall, the sentiment emphasises the need to keep the internet open, secure, and globally connected.

Olivier Crepin-Leblond

The Dynamic Coalition, led by Olivier Crepin-Leblond, extends an invitation to individuals to join their year-round discussions. Notably, there is no requirement for a membership fee, making it inclusive and accessible to a wide range of participants.

The work of the Dynamic Coalition holds significance, as they will be creating a report based on their sessions. This report will be taken into account in the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) messages for the Kyoto meeting, emphasizing the recognition of the Coalition's efforts and their valuable contributions.

The initiatives of the Dynamic Coalition align with two Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): SDG 9, focusing on industry, innovation, and infrastructure, and SDG 17, emphasizing partnerships for goal achievement. This demonstrates the Coalition's commitment to contributing to the global sustainable development agenda.

Overall, the Dynamic Coalition, under the leadership of Olivier Crepin-Leblond, provides an open platform for discussions and collaboration. Their dedication to producing a report that influences internet governance decisions highlights the importance of their work. Furthermore, by aligning their efforts with key SDGs, the Coalition showcases its commitment to contributing to global sustainable development goals.

Speakers

AP

Alejandro Pisanty

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156 words per minute

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579 words

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222 secs

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Audience

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DA

Deborah Allen Rogers

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IP

Iria Puyosa

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JR

Jane R. Coffin

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Joseph

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Lee Rainie

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NQ

Nii Quaynor

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OC

Olivier Crepin-Leblond

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Shiva

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SB

Sébastien Bachollet

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VC

Vint Cerf

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